Archive for the ‘Firefox’ Category

Firefox for Solaris now directly available from the Free Download link!

November 28, 2008

Just after I created my last blog entry (the one with the download links for the Solaris versions of Firefox), I noticed that when you go to http://www.firefox.com using Solaris (you’ll be redirected to http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/) and then click on the Free Download link, you directly go to a section in the release notes where you can download Firefox for Solaris!

However, if you would like to download the Solaris versions of Firefox when using another operating system (or if you’d like to work with the previous version of Firefox), I suggest that you read my last blog entry and use one of the links in the table 😉

P.S. The README (on the above mentioned download page) describes how to install the Java plugin and the Flash/Shockwave plugin.

Firefox for Solaris – latest versions as of Nov. 2008

November 27, 2008

These are the direct links for downloading the latest versions of Firefox for Solaris:

Version x86 SPARC
Firefox 3.0.4 OpenSolaris pkg  |  tar

pkg  |  tar
Firefox 3.0.4 Solaris 10 pkg  |  tar pkg  |  tar
Firefox 2.0.0.18 Solaris 10 pkg  |  tar pkg  |  tar
Firefox 2.0.0.18 Solaris 8 pkg  |  tar pkg  |  tar

Firefox 3.0 released – where are the OpenSolaris versions?

June 18, 2008

Firefox 3.0 is now released, as you may have heard already.

Here are the direct links for downloading the OpenSolaris versions:

If you like vi or Vim, you’ll also like Vimperator!

July 4, 2007

Imagine you could have a browser with a command line which has nearly all important vi commands! Imagine you could scroll a page down using f, search using “/”, or navigate to another tab using “b” and the number of the tab!
How? Just go to the Vimperator site, download the latest xpi file and drag it into your Firefox window to install it.
Be aware that it’s still beta – currently open bugs are here. But it works reasonably well already.

My favorite Firefox extensions – updated

April 12, 2007

Click here.
The most useful one for bloggers is probably CoLT which can copy a URL and its description into the clipboard. Also, one of the tab counters (Tab Counter or TabCount) can be really useful in case you fear losing control over your tabs.

Developing Firefox extensions

March 31, 2007

Some links which might help you (and me 😉 ) developing Firefox extensions:</p Getting Started
How to set up the development environment
Link collection, basics
Code examples for access to Firefox tabs
A lot of Firefox extensions
Firefox extensions FAQ
Tutorial on creating Firefox extensions
Another tutorial

My favorite Firefox extensions…

March 31, 2007

… are:

  • ReloadEvery – small tool for reloading a tab at a certain interval.
  • Download Statusbar – a tool that eliminates the download window and shows download in a status bar instead. Very cool and very useful. I am pretty sure something like that will be integrated into one of the next firefox releases.
  • CoLT – a tool for copying a URL and its description into the clipboard. Very useful for blogging!
  • del.icio.us Bookmarks – Easy to use bookmark manager with tagging. However, the aditional popup when closing Firefox is annoying.
  • MIME Edit – change MIME types in Firefox.
  • AutoClose Tabs – closes unused tabs after a while (up to Firefox 3.5).
  • TabAway – close your current tab by double clicking on another one.
  • GreaseMonkey – for changing a web page behavior using JavaScript.
  • SwitchProxy – for easy and fast switching of your proxy settings – in case you do not want to use this method.
  • Vimperator – use well-known keyboard commands in your Firefox browser.

And these are my favorite Thunderbird extensions:

Firefox and the middle mouse button

March 2, 2007

Have you ever pressed the middle mouse button in Firefox while not over a link, in a web site where you cannot use the browser’s “Go back one page” button? If yes, you may have had to log out and log back in again, and maybe you also lost your last entries that you made in the page where you pressed the middle mouse button! Too bad! Here’s …

How to switch off that (and only that) middle mouse button behavior in Firefox.

  • Type in about:config in one of your browser tabs.
  • Type in middlemouse in the Filter entry line.
  • Double-click the middlemouse.contentLoadURL line to switch the value from true to false. The line will be shown in bold afterwards.

That’s all!

Related links:
Customizing Mozilla->Key Bindings. A good starting point for Firefox customization.
How to find your Mozilla profile. (Not needed here as about:config (see above) is the way to change settings.)

Automatic proxy switching in Firefox

September 18, 2006

After each installation of Firefox, I always installed the SwitchProxy extension which I found quite useful, as I sometimes am connected directly to the internet, and at other times, when connected through VPN, I am using a proxy. The SwitchProxy extension allows me to choose the correct proxy in a menu bar, so I don’t have to go to “Tools->Options->General->Connection Settings” and choose the correct proxy settings.

The problem with that extension, as with all extensions, is that you typically have to reinstall an up-to-date version after a new release of Firefox is out. So I tried to find more information about the syntax and capabilities of the automatic proxy configuration file and found quite useful information in Wikipedia and at Mozilla. Although most documents only describe the http:// URL, it’s (of course) also possible to use the file:// URL for the proxy config file. Might be useful if you do not have write access to a web server…

Let the browser find your proxy

Just create a local file /etc/proxy.pac, /home/<username>/cfg/proxy.pac, or C:\cfg\proxy.pac (or whatever path you like) in your current operating system environment, and replace the string proxy.domain.xxx:8080 with your specific proxy host name and port:

function FindProxyForURL(url, host) {
return "PROXY proxy.domain.xxx:8080; DIRECT";
}

Then, enter the following in your Firefox proxy settings, in the line Automatic Proxy Configuration URL:

file:///etc/proxy.pac

or, in Windows:

file:///C:/cfg/proxy.pac

and click “OK”. That’s all.

BTW – Lots of examples for automatic proxy config files can be found when searching the web for the string “FindProxyForURL”